A moving tribute to a very special lady, Daisy Campbell: why care and support really matters

Susan Farrell and Ian Campbell recently shared the story of their mum, Daisy Campbell, with us, and explained just why Dimbleby Cancer Care became such an important part of her life.

“Mum never told her friends or relatives she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. That was her way. It wasn’t that it was something she was scared or embarrassed about. She just didn’t give it the time of day or head space and didn’t want others to either. She didn’t want pity or sadness she just wanted to carry on as normal. It was not going to get in her way. And so mum lived with cancer. It did change her though; and we are eternally grateful to Dimbleby Cancer Care for that.

Brighton 1996

Daisy Campbell (left) with her friend Muriel Matthews on a day out in Brighton

 

I remember attending one of mum’s early post op check-ups, picking up a leaflet and mum talking to a lovely lady at St Thomas’ about meeting others as part of a support group. Not that mum needed support: mum supported others. She never put herself first – it wasn’t her way. But Dimbleby was different from the very start. Mum met her best mate Muriel at the Dimbleby Centre – both in their 70s and up for a chunk of life and laughter. Mum had many years, many happy years, supported by the generous, life supporting people at DCC.

The support from Dimbleby Cancer Care gave mum a new energy. She loved everything about it and what it stood for and most of all she loved the caring staff. During the difficult times mum would still attend the regular meetings and talk to friends, no strings attached.

Mum loved being pampered, but never pushed herself forward, so it was always lovely to hear when she’d had maybe a knee or foot massage or would show me her new painted nails! Mum’s strong spirit and sense of fun was always evident and I looked forward each week to hearing the latest tales and exploits from St Thomas’. Mum was amongst friends and people who she could talk to openly – even if I was less convinced about her Christmas decoration making skills!

When, in later years, the cancer cruelly came back she would wax lyrical about the lady who soothed her with relaxing aromatherapy. Those sessions were incredibly important to mum because she had something positive and nice on the horizon to counter the less pleasant trips for radiotherapy treatments.

What more can I say about my mum? not nearly enough. But I can say that the generosity of others to support DCC helped my mum immeasurably and for that we are all truly grateful.”

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